Rewards And Punishments Become A Prison

Researchers investigated the impact of parenting practices on the amount of time young children spend in front of screens. They found a majority of parents use screen time to control behavior, especially on weekends. This results in children spending an average of 20 minutes more a day on weekends in front of a screen. Researchers say this is likely because using it as a reward or punishment heightens a child’s attraction to the activity.

We don’t use rewards and punishments because they have unpredictable results!

Right In Front Of Your Nose

I’ve been told when you love someone you don’t see their faults.

That’s the conclusion of a new study that shows 17 percent of mothers of obese children recognized their child to be “moderately” or “very” overweight.

Why do parents ignore obvious problems with their children? Perhaps it’s because they do not notice them.

“To see what is in front of one’s nose needs a constant struggle.” — George Orwell

We are all struggling, aren’t we?

The Dog Ate It

Homework makes kids unhappy. It makes parents unhappy too.

Family stress increased as homework load increased and as parent’s perception of their capacity to assist decreased.

Golly if only someone would invent a system of schools that doesn’t have homework assignments at all.

Gunn High School senior Akila Subramanian, as quoted by Haddock, summed the situation up perfectly, “It all comes down to whether adults trust us to learn. Having no homework lets you find your own motivations.” Rather than just focusing on academic developments, Montessori advocated aiding the overall development of each child as a human being. The more freedom children have to make up their own problems and choose their own work, the more they will challenge themselves and the better able they will become at evaluating themselves. What you believe about a child is exactly what the child will believe about himself or herself – and that is one of the most important factors in school success.