Smog

In an analysis of data from nearly 700 children, Younan and her team found that kids in Los Angeles who were exposed to more air pollution over the course of adolescence were more likely to engage in delinquent behavior.

Read the article for details, but it seems pretty thorough.

Younan specifically looked at the pollution from particulate matter 2.5, tiny particles that are 30 times smaller than a human hair. “It’s not smog that people can see,” she says. “But if they can’t see it, it’s bad.” This type of pollution primarily comes from cars and traffic, Younan says.

Go Run Around

“Being active, getting sweaty and roughhousing offer more than just physical health benefits. They also protect against depression,” says Tonje Zahl, a PhD candidate at NTNU.

Somehow, being happy keeps you from being sad.

Physically active six- and eight-year-olds showed fewer symptoms of depression when they were examined two years later.

Be Happy

Stressing yourself out for the sake of your family can just mess up your kids.

Exposure to early and chronic maternal depression markedly increases a child’s susceptibility to psychopathology and social-emotional problems, including social withdrawal, poor emotion regulation, and reduced empathy to others.

Enduring saddness for your child’s sake is no accomplishment.