Seven Times As Likely To Have ADHD

Compared with children who had less than 30 minutes of screen time per day, children exposed to more than two hours were five times more likely to exhibit clinically significant “externalizing” behavioural problems such as inattention — and are more than seven times more likely to meet the criteria for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD),

This is a new study from Canada.

Current Canadian guidelines call for no more than two hours of screen time a day at that age. But our research suggests that less screen time is even better.

Government guidelines vary from country to country. The worldwide scientific consensus is that the best amount of screen time including smartphones, tablets, and televisions, is zero.

With The Information Superhighway You Can Be Everywhere

Might a few stolen moments used to check a couple text messages have a deeper effect?

While more research is needed, the study suggests it might: Even low or seemingly normal amounts of tech-related interruption were associated with greater child behavior problems, such as oversensitivity, hot tempers, hyperactivity and whining.

The best classrooms I’ve seen simply do not allow smartphones or tablets or screens of any kind on the premises. Leave them in a box outside.

Reserving certain times of the day or locations as being technology-free—such as mealtime or playtime right after work—may help ease family tensions caused by the modern blurring of outside worlds with home life, they say.

Racism Is Injurious To Children

Among the questions asked in the survey was whether a child had been subjected to some form of racism. Parents who responded affirmatively to that question were also 5.4 percent less likely to say their child was in excellent health. They were 3.2 percent more likely to report their child had ADHD.

It’s hard to concentrate when everyone hates you and plans on doing you harm.

Is Kindergarten Harmful To Five-Year-Olds?

This Stanford study seems to say so.

“We found that delaying kindergarten for one year reduced inattention and hyperactivity by 73 percent for an average child at age 11,” Dee said, “and it virtually eliminated the probability that an average child at that age would have an ‘abnormal,’ or higher-than-normal rating for the inattentive-hyperactive behavioral measure.”

Kindergarten is not designed with a scientific understanding of the needs of five-year-olds. It’s no surprise that it fails them.